A Not Subtle Hearing Issue

Though rare, sudden hearing loss (SHL) is not unknown. And though the medical community does not fully understand the phenomena, any abrupt cessation of hearing in an ear is cause to seek urgent medical attention.

SHL can be temporary or permanent. Only time will tell. It can also affect one or both ears. Early intervention is key.

The cause of SHL is not clearly understood but there are a number of factors believed to be at play, either singly or in combination. These include the delayed effects of ear infections or spinal injuries; issues stemming from chronic blood circulation problems like obesity, blood clots, arteriosclerosis, and diabetes; and bouts of stress that curtail blood flow.

The “sudden” part of SHL is meaningful. Oftentimes hearing loss is clearly related to disease — meningitis, mumps, or chickenpox for example — or exposure to high-decibel sound that directly damages the inner ear. SHL happens suddenly, with no clear cause or even an earache of any kind.

A bout of tinnitus — an unremitting ringing sound that is heard but not produced by anything in the hearer’s environment — does sometimes happen as part of a SHL event. Fluctuating pressure in the ear and numbness also are accompanying symptoms.

As a first step, medical care providers will deliver treatment that produces better blood circulation to the head, since this sometimes clears up the problem. If this isn’t successful, then further testing will be required. An ear microscopy and/or MRI can find evidence of the underlying issue that has caused the SHL.

The key is to seek immediate medical care. SHL is a medical crisis and can be a sign of other underlying medical issues. Don’t wait for it to “clear up” on its own.