Tinnitus: Here Today, Maybe Here Tomorrow

If it becomes persistent, tinnitus can truly become one of life’s not so little annoyances.


There are some strategies for dealing with it—but no known permanent cure. It’s a perplexing syndrome that isn’t fully understood and, unfortunately, not as rare as one would hope. It is generally understood to be the manifestation of underlying damage to the auditory system, usually due to aging or exposure to excessive noise.


Simply put, tinnitus is the hearing of sound that’s not really “there.” There’s no doubt that those dealing with the condition hear “it,” but what they’re hearing is not a sound that’s coming from outside of their bodies. It’s coming from inside the hearer — and they can’t make the sound go away.
The American Tinnitus Association states on its webpage that it “can manifest many different perceptions of sound, including buzzing, hissing, whistling, swooshing, and clicking. In some rare cases, tinnitus patients report hearing music.”


Studies show that well over 10 percent of Americans experience it at some point, though luckily in many cases it’s only temporary.


If one is not so lucky, then ways to manage it include shunning silent environments (since whatever sound is being heard is harder to ignore), protecting ears from loudness (which can make matters worse), and practicing relaxation techniques (to lessen the stress that can be caused by tinnitus). Some people have also found that certain foods or activities will consistently worsen the situation or bring on a new bout.


If a sound of unknown origin becomes persistent and bothersome, then visiting a hearing health professional is the first step to managing the situation.