That Was Then, This Is Now

A few weeks ago, Better Hearing and Speech Month — annually recognized each May to heighten hearing-related issues — was to focus on “Communication at Work.” Seemed like a worthy and simple enough topic.

But that was then.

On April 30, the president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) announced that the month would instead be marked by outreach on a wide variety of hearing issues. This is a recognition that people — both hearing health customers and their healthcare providers —are now dealing with a wide variety of unexpected issues during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Over the month several topics will be explored by ASHA via updates at the organization’s website.

These include “Early Intervention and COVID-19: Advice for Parents of Children Whose Services Are Interrupted,” “Helping Children With Language Disorders Maintain Social Connection While at Home,” “Zoom Meetings and Stuttering: Tips to Make Virtual Interactions More Successful,” and “Augmentative and Alternative Communication and COVID-19: Enabling Communication for Acute Care Patients.”

First established in 1927 by ASHA and today fully supported by the federal National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) — which is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) — Better Hearing and Speech Month is meant to highlight hearing health issues.

But there’s only one overriding health issue this year.

“Our goal is to champion every person’s ability to communicate, including at this difficult time,” said ASHA President Theresa H. Rodgers when announcing the change.

From hearing loss research being disrupted to audiologists from coast-to-coast having to alter their visitation policies, COVID-19 is severely impacting not just individuals but an entire industry.