Allergies Can Wreak Havoc

With the change of season — even though COVID can make it seem like it’s been March forever — another allergy season upon us. Although the physical response to these annual transition periods is usually marked by respiratory issues, allergies can also adversely affect your hearing.

An allergic reaction is basically your body’s immune system overreacting. During allergy season, your body gets kind of overdramatic about pollen and other irritants (heating systems that have gotten dusty over the summer are another instigator) and acts like it’s under attack. Countermeasures are released. This usually results in swelling and the buildup of fluids.

And all of that can happen in your ears.

The proper functioning of the ear is founded on a number of things — an unobstructed ear canal and consistent air pressure around the eardrum are two of those things. Congestion, phlegm, and inflammation can wreak havoc with normal operating procedures in the ear.

This is especially true when the Eustachian tubes — which do the work of regulating air pressure and providing a path for fluid outflow by connecting the middle ear and the throat — get clogged up by those countermeasures that your body has unleashed.

Allergies can also, in many cases, cause the body to crank up the production of earwax, since it is actually part of the ear’s defense mechanism. It’s produced in the outer ear to guard the inner ear against debris.

All of this gets in the way of hearing.

Luckily, treating an allergic outbreak with over-the-counter medications usually reduces symptoms — including hearing loss or ringing in the ears. More severe reactions may require prescription medications and, if hearing issues linger for more than a week, then visiting your hearing health professional is a good idea.