COVID Brings Hearing Consequences

In an unfortunate, but perhaps not a surprising turn of events, it appears that COVID-19 is amplifying, as it were, hearing issues for many.

Recent articles in medical publications are beginning to chronicle the rise in tinnitus that some are experiencing in the age of COVID — and not necessarily simply because they’ve gotten the disease itself.

The study “Changes in Tinnitus Experiences During the COVID-19 Pandemic” appeared in Frontiers in Public Health. It summarizes a study of over 3,000 that focused on those who already suffered from the condition, known to many as simply a constant ringing-in-the-ears (though other sounds can also plague people).

“Having COVID-19 symptoms exacerbated tinnitus in 40% of respondents, made no change in 54%, and improved tinnitus in 6%,” states the article. “Other mediating factors such as the social and emotional consequences of the pandemic made pre-existing tinnitus more bothersome for 32% of the respondents.”

A host of consequences from COVID were listed in the report’s findings as perhaps contributing to the rising rate of tinnitus, including poor sleep patterns, the inability to exercise regularly, loneliness, depression, anxiety, and economic stress.

In contrast, a study in the Ear, Nose & Throat Journal entitled simply “COVID-19 and Tinnitus” discusses “… the first reported case of hearing loss and tinnitus in a COVID-19 patient, in the State of Qatar, and this case report strives to contribute to the ocean of literature highlighting the need for otorhinolaryngologists [nose and sinus specialists] to be aware of its correlation with COVID-19 virus.”

The study’s conclusion argues, “…this case report highlights the importance of detailed audiological diagnostics in COVID-19 patients who experience isolated tinnitus and hearing loss.”

These are sadly probably not the last studies regarding hearing loss, tinnitus, and COVID.