The Fine Art of Mask Wearing

The news regarding COVID-19 is not good. There’s renewed emphasis on the need for people to wear masks when out of their house.

This presents some challenges to anyone who uses a hearing aid.

Everyone “lip-reads” when speaking with someone else. The use of visual cues when conversing is so ingrained that we don’t even realize we do it. Body English is really a thing. But people wearing masks and talking will notice how strange it is to not see the speaker’s face. If you’re hearing-impaired, the loss of this information is even more challenging.

The only way to compensate is for people to speak slower and more clearly. Letting them know how challenging this all is with a hearing aid will help them do their best to communicate. Avoiding situations with a lot of background noise will help too.

And wearing a mask with elastic ear loops and a hearing aid can be a mess and take some getting used to — especially if eyeglasses are involved too. That’s just a traffic pile up at the ears.

One strategy is to use masks with tie strings instead. Less material in the ear area and no loop to catch hold of a hearing aid when being removed.

There are also mask holders that are popular with medical personal. They provide a way to connect the elastic ear loops behind your head. Something similar can be rigged up with plastic S-hooks or even large paperclips.

What’s clear is that there is a renewed push to make mask-wearing common and universal. Unfortunately, COVID-19 is not going away anytime soon.

Hearing: A Core Aspect of Sociability

If the past few months have brought any issue to the forefront, it’s the concept of social connectedness. As our ability to get together and socialize — to undertake the rituals of the every day — has been restricted, it’s become ever more apparent what social animals we are.

And for the vast majority of humans, hearing is a crucial part of that equation. This isn’t news to researchers and, for that matter, people who have struggled not fully participating in conversations due to hearing loss issues.

Studying this fact — especially as it relates to aging — has been a significant part of the work of Barbara E. Weinstein, who is a professor of audiology at the Graduate Center CUNY and an adjunct professor at the New York University Langone Medical Center. She is the author of the textbook Geriatric Audiology, published in 2012.

As part of her research, she developed the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly, now an industry-standard diagnostic tool.

In a recent interview, Weinstein goes in-depth about her life’s work. When she began, things were different (and not just technologically).

“It was a time when audiologists were just starting to dispense hearing aids. Theoretically, the early 80s wasn’t that early in the profession, but just, people were not focused on the person, they were focused on the new and emerging technology!” she explains. “After developing the Hearing Handicap Inventory, every single study in which I was engaged, was to get people to buy into the importance of the patient and how our interventions can improve the lives of older adults with hearing loss.”

That work that has culminated in today’s audiological philosophy, with the importance of hearing health to people’s overall health fully realized.

“Physicians know that isolation/loneliness is a bad thing, and that loneliness has negative effects on morbidity and mortality,” says Weinstein. “If they recognize that age-related hearing loss is a potentially modifiable risk factor for social isolation/loneliness and that we can make a difference in people’s lives by intervening with hearing aids, I think that’s the whole goal and that is the way to increase referrals to optimize hearing health and overall well-being.”

The full interview can be found at the Audiology Blog of the hearing aid maker Phonak.

That Was Then, This Is Now

A few weeks ago, Better Hearing and Speech Month — annually recognized each May to heighten hearing-related issues — was to focus on “Communication at Work.” Seemed like a worthy and simple enough topic.

But that was then.

On April 30, the president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) announced that the month would instead be marked by outreach on a wide variety of hearing issues. This is a recognition that people — both hearing health customers and their healthcare providers —are now dealing with a wide variety of unexpected issues during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Over the month several topics will be explored by ASHA via updates at the organization’s website.

These include “Early Intervention and COVID-19: Advice for Parents of Children Whose Services Are Interrupted,” “Helping Children With Language Disorders Maintain Social Connection While at Home,” “Zoom Meetings and Stuttering: Tips to Make Virtual Interactions More Successful,” and “Augmentative and Alternative Communication and COVID-19: Enabling Communication for Acute Care Patients.”

First established in 1927 by ASHA and today fully supported by the federal National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) — which is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) — Better Hearing and Speech Month is meant to highlight hearing health issues.

But there’s only one overriding health issue this year.

“Our goal is to champion every person’s ability to communicate, including at this difficult time,” said ASHA President Theresa H. Rodgers when announcing the change.

From hearing loss research being disrupted to audiologists from coast-to-coast having to alter their visitation policies, COVID-19 is severely impacting not just individuals but an entire industry.

Hearing Aids Weren’t Always So Easy

Today, hearing aids are the embodiment of Moore’s Law. That was a predictive observation made in the 1960s that the number of transistors a microchip could contain would double every couple of years, which would lead to generation after generation of smaller yet more powerful computers.

This is why, as far as computer processing goes, a contemporary hearing aid does what a computer that would have taken up a couple of suitcases did in the 1950s.

But hearing aids didn’t always require computer technology.

The first ones were basically just horns — first those of animals, then customized from brass like a trumpet — with the narrow end held in the ear while the wide end cast a wider net for sound waves. So it was for centuries.

But when the telephone was invented it didn’t take long to adapt it to the hard-of-hearing. The basic premise of the telephone — electrical currents taking sound from a transmitter on one end to a receiver on the other, with an amplifier to boost volume — is the foundation of all modern hearing aids.

But some hardy souls had to literally do the “heavy lifting” in the early days to pave the way for today’s models, which are so small that users can forget they’re even using one.

The first widely available hearing aid — the Vactuphone made by the Western Electric Company — hit the market in 1921. It sold for the equivalent of $1,500 today and was … the size of a suitcase. And really too heavy to take out of the house.

It wasn’t until the invention of the transistor in 1948 that hearing aids easily integrated into everyday life became possible. Slowly but surely they became both better and smaller — though it wasn’t until the digital age that in-the-ear hearing aids with superb performance and interconnectivity with a wide range of other wireless devices became a reality.

Six Ways Hearing Can Be Lost

Hearing loss can happen for any number of reasons, though some things are far more likely to cause it than others. Here are the top six triggers for diminished hearing.

  1. Just Getting Older
    If you’re lucky and wait long enough, it’ll probably happen to you. The inner ear is a marvel, with lots of tiny moving parts that do what they do every day of your life. Eventually, parts start to wear out.
  2. Can’t Fight Genetics
    Speaking of marvels, all the genetic information that goes into a human being is astounding. A gram of human DNA holds about a zettabyte — that’s 10 to the 21st power (basically, a lot of zeroes) — of data. Sometimes some of it gets garbled, making genetic predisposition the second most prominent driver of hearing loss.
  3. Issues At Birth
    Birth issues such as maternal diabetes, neonatal jaundice, and premature delivery can cause hearing problems that are permanent.
  4. As Do Infections
    Most ear infections cause only temporary hearing loss, but severe ones can create enduring issues. Take ear infections seriously.
  5. There Are Bones In There
    A dislocated shoulder from a sports injury is not out of the ordinary. Unfortunately, that kind of hard contact can do the same to the tiny bones in the ear. Nerve damage can also result from a hard blow to the head. Concussion protocol includes tracking any potential hearing issues.
  6. Loudness Is The Enemy
    The most likely way to damage ears for most people is exposure to excessive sound. This can be extreme sound like a noisy work environment or not using ear protection when firing a gun. Or loud concerts. Or earbuds or headphones with the volume turned up too high. This is the easiest culprit for people to control.

There’s nothing you can do — other than to manage the problem with hearing aids —about several items on this list. But not number six. Take care of your ears when you can.

Tinnitus: Here Today, Maybe Here Tomorrow

If it becomes persistent, tinnitus can truly become one of life’s not so little annoyances.


There are some strategies for dealing with it—but no known permanent cure. It’s a perplexing syndrome that isn’t fully understood and, unfortunately, not as rare as one would hope. It is generally understood to be the manifestation of underlying damage to the auditory system, usually due to aging or exposure to excessive noise.


Simply put, tinnitus is the hearing of sound that’s not really “there.” There’s no doubt that those dealing with the condition hear “it,” but what they’re hearing is not a sound that’s coming from outside of their bodies. It’s coming from inside the hearer — and they can’t make the sound go away.
The American Tinnitus Association states on its webpage that it “can manifest many different perceptions of sound, including buzzing, hissing, whistling, swooshing, and clicking. In some rare cases, tinnitus patients report hearing music.”


Studies show that well over 10 percent of Americans experience it at some point, though luckily in many cases it’s only temporary.


If one is not so lucky, then ways to manage it include shunning silent environments (since whatever sound is being heard is harder to ignore), protecting ears from loudness (which can make matters worse), and practicing relaxation techniques (to lessen the stress that can be caused by tinnitus). Some people have also found that certain foods or activities will consistently worsen the situation or bring on a new bout.


If a sound of unknown origin becomes persistent and bothersome, then visiting a hearing health professional is the first step to managing the situation.

Once Again, Oticon Is a Winner

For the fourth year running, Oticon has been honored by the Consumer Electronics Association (CTA) at its annual trade show for bringing some of the most innovative products to market.
Two Oticon brands won CES 2020 Innovation Awards. One was in the Health & Wellness category, where the Oticon Xceed — a hearing aid for those with severe-to-profound hearing loss — won. Meanwhile, the company’s soon-to-be-released e-health platform RemoteCare won in the Tech for a Better World category.


“We are extremely proud to have Oticon Xceed and Oticon RemoteCare honored by the Consumer Electronics Association,” announced the president of Oticon, Gary Rosenblum. “Our ability to consistently stand out in a competition that includes some of the world’s most cutting-edge consumer technology products and services underscores Oticon’s commitment to develop hearing technology that makes a real difference in people’s lives.”


The Xceed provides a powerful tool for people who’s hearing loss has traditionally been a challenge for the industry. The product provides formidable output without the feedback issues that often plague hearing aids that have to compensate for severe hearing issues. It delivers an auditory environment for users that is less stressful and enhances short-term recall of conversations.


The customer service that RemoteCare will provide is startling. Using Internet connectivity, hearing aids will be able to not only collect data in real time and transfer it to hearing health professionals — but any needed adjustments can then be made remotely. The scheduling of office visits and all the complications they generate will be lessened and users will see performance gains straightaway.


Both products build on Oticon’s long track record of adapting cutting-edge technology to the needs of the hearing impaired.

The Advantages of Bluetooth Technology

The full integration of Bluetooth tech into the routine functions of hearing aids has brought a wealth of new possibilities.

Due to the incorporation of higher computer functions into what used to be basically simple amplifiers, hearing aids are now yet another aspect of the Internet of Things (IoT). The interconnectivity that Bluetooth provides — by creating a small wireless network in which devices can communicate — allows hearing aids to connect to other machines nearby and, by extension, to the Internet via another device’s WiFi capabilities.

Bluetooth connections are stable and not dependent on a WiFi network’s strength. They work within only a small radius.

This is why it is now possible, using a dedicated app, to control a hearing aid’s functions with a smartphone or tablet. The ability Bluetooth affords for near-instantaneous interaction between the two devices means no more fumbling with tiny knobs or buttons on a hearing aid. It also allows for a far wider range of controls.

Likewise, sound can now be transmitted electronically directly to the hearing aid. The oh-so-annoying squeal that used to mark phone conversations with a hearing aid is a thing of the past. Anything one listens to from electronic sources — radios, televisions, listening devices — can now be streamed directly into hearing aids, resulting in much higher sound quality and the ability to avoid distractions from other sources of noise.

Finally, hearing aids can gather data on the sound dynamics of where you spend your time and how you use your hearing aids. This can then be uploaded — via the Bluetooth connection with your app, then from app to your hearing health provider via the Internet — and the data used to fine-tune your hearing aid for the future.

Managing Thanksgiving With Hearing Loss

Handling hearing issues, even with state-of-the-art hearing aids, can be an everyday challenge. On special days — like Thanksgiving — it can be even more of a trial.

Now, if the tradition for the big meal in your family is a descent into political trench warfare, maybe you’ll just want to turn your hearing aid down low and eat in blissful silence. It’s a known go-to strategy.

But if you want to communicate fully with your loved ones, here are some ideas on how to manage the hubbub of a boisterous Thanksgiving dinner with hearing loss.

First, be prepared to let anyone at the gathering who you don’t see very often know that you’re a little hard of hearing. The “new friend” being brought home to meet the family may not have been informed and letting them know will make things easier on everyone.

And remember the old maxim of location, location, location.  Sitting next to the TV with the big game blasting from it will make things much more difficult. Being away from sources of noise, with a wall behind you so that you’re dealing with 180° of sound — as opposed to a full 360° — will help immensely. At the dinner table, avoid sitting in the middle. Grab a seat on one end and converse with people nearby.

If it all becomes too much, take respite in a quiet room or outside. Like a work break, this will allow your ears and brain to relax and recharge.

And finally, if you have a hearing aid – then use it! No reason to be coy with loved ones. There’s nothing to be embarrassed about and your family is there to support you.

The Current State of Treating Hearing Loss

The science of gauging and treating hearing loss and auditory disorders is far advanced. Today’s technology — and decades of medical progress — now provide a wealth of options for anyone with hearing issues.

Ways to provide rehabilitation include hearing aids, cochlear implants, and therapeutic approaches. Methods employed will depend to some extent on the nature of the hearing loss being managed.

Profound hearing loss may require cochlear implants, which are complex devices that incorporate surgically inserted electrodes that send signals directly to the brain, bypassing the hearing apparatus of the inner ear. A significant amount of subsequent therapeutic training is necessary to make them a successful intervention.

Speech pathologists will be the frontline professional who works with those adapting to cochlear implants, but the kind of audiological rehabilitation they provide can also help a wide array of people with less profound issues learn to manage their hearing loss. This is especially true if it was not immediately treated and “bad habits” developed.

The therapeutic approaches these hearing professionals will manage include developing better hearing techniques, speechreading (based in part on lipreading), and strategies to create a better environment for hearing (including ways that speakers can communicate more clearly).

Ultimately, hearing aids are the most common form of treatment for auditory disorders, especially presbycusis (hearing loss due to age). Contemporary hearing aids are powerful tools. They incorporate significant computing powers that not only provide amplification of sound in the parts of the spectrum where it is needed, but also deliver a wide array of interconnectivity with other wireless devices. This provides access to streaming music, captioned devices, and supplemental assistive listening tools such as infrared and FM systems.