Hearing Aids Weren’t Always So Easy

Today, hearing aids are the embodiment of Moore’s Law. That was a predictive observation made in the 1960s that the number of transistors a microchip could contain would double every couple of years, which would lead to generation after generation of smaller yet more powerful computers.

This is why, as far as computer processing goes, a contemporary hearing aid does what a computer that would have taken up a couple of suitcases did in the 1950s.

But hearing aids didn’t always require computer technology.

The first ones were basically just horns — first those of animals, then customized from brass like a trumpet — with the narrow end held in the ear while the wide end cast a wider net for sound waves. So it was for centuries.

But when the telephone was invented it didn’t take long to adapt it to the hard-of-hearing. The basic premise of the telephone — electrical currents taking sound from a transmitter on one end to a receiver on the other, with an amplifier to boost volume — is the foundation of all modern hearing aids.

But some hardy souls had to literally do the “heavy lifting” in the early days to pave the way for today’s models, which are so small that users can forget they’re even using one.

The first widely available hearing aid — the Vactuphone made by the Western Electric Company — hit the market in 1921. It sold for the equivalent of $1,500 today and was … the size of a suitcase. And really too heavy to take out of the house.

It wasn’t until the invention of the transistor in 1948 that hearing aids easily integrated into everyday life became possible. Slowly but surely they became both better and smaller — though it wasn’t until the digital age that in-the-ear hearing aids with superb performance and interconnectivity with a wide range of other wireless devices became a reality.

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