Some Myths About Hearing

There are any number of myths — widely held assumptions — about hearing issues. Here are a few of them.

Hearing Loss Is For the Oldsters

Actually, over 60 percent of the approximately 50 million people in the United States with hearing loss issues are under the age of 65. It’s obviously not an issue that you’ll only find at an AARP convention.

Currently, a number of factors seem to be making hearing loss an issue earlier in life. These include the widespread use of personal audio devices and the earbuds/headphones that come with them, the rising regularity of loud sound systems in public places, and the generally high volume of modern life (and increasing rarity of relative silence). It has been reported that in the 12- to 19-year-old age bracket, 1 in 5 already show signs of some kind of hearing loss issue.

Hearing Loss Is an Isolated Problem

Hearing is its own subdivision of overall health, right? Not really. There are now numerous studies linking hearing loss — especially when left untreated — with a series of negative outcomes, especially regarding mental health. Hearing loss can lead to social isolation and depression, which are directly linked to cognitive decline and dementia (which may also be linked to degraded brain activity due to the loss of sound inputs).

On the prevention of hearing loss side of the equation, there is also ample evidence that better overall cardiovascular health usually leads to healthier hearing. The inner ear is very dependent on good blood circulation and a degrading of overall physical health can lead to hearing issues.

Hearing Loss Is Inevitable

Not really. Like so much about one’s health, genetics plays a huge part. In some cases, hearing loss will happen. But in many cases, preventive strategies may make hearing loss far less likely. As mentioned above, good cardiovascular health will help (so, smoking is a clear risk factor for hearing loss). But the most obvious way to prevent hearing loss is to avoid exposure to high-decibel noise and, if you know you will be exposed, then to use ear protection. Loud noise damages the ear and avoiding it can mean avoiding hearing loss issues.

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