Hearing: A Core Aspect of Sociability

If the past few months have brought any issue to the forefront, it’s the concept of social connectedness. As our ability to get together and socialize — to undertake the rituals of the every day — has been restricted, it’s become ever more apparent what social animals we are.

And for the vast majority of humans, hearing is a crucial part of that equation. This isn’t news to researchers and, for that matter, people who have struggled not fully participating in conversations due to hearing loss issues.

Studying this fact — especially as it relates to aging — has been a significant part of the work of Barbara E. Weinstein, who is a professor of audiology at the Graduate Center CUNY and an adjunct professor at the New York University Langone Medical Center. She is the author of the textbook Geriatric Audiology, published in 2012.

As part of her research, she developed the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly, now an industry-standard diagnostic tool.

In a recent interview, Weinstein goes in-depth about her life’s work. When she began, things were different (and not just technologically).

“It was a time when audiologists were just starting to dispense hearing aids. Theoretically, the early 80s wasn’t that early in the profession, but just, people were not focused on the person, they were focused on the new and emerging technology!” she explains. “After developing the Hearing Handicap Inventory, every single study in which I was engaged, was to get people to buy into the importance of the patient and how our interventions can improve the lives of older adults with hearing loss.”

That work that has culminated in today’s audiological philosophy, with the importance of hearing health to people’s overall health fully realized.

“Physicians know that isolation/loneliness is a bad thing, and that loneliness has negative effects on morbidity and mortality,” says Weinstein. “If they recognize that age-related hearing loss is a potentially modifiable risk factor for social isolation/loneliness and that we can make a difference in people’s lives by intervening with hearing aids, I think that’s the whole goal and that is the way to increase referrals to optimize hearing health and overall well-being.”

The full interview can be found at the Audiology Blog of the hearing aid maker Phonak.